Welcome to The Institute for Advanced Studies in Aging and Geriatric Medicine

Proposed Geriatrics Center

We are proposing a first of its kind geriatrics clinical service in the Washington metropolitan area. The principles, however, have been established elsewhere; as similar programs have been developed within academic centers. What will distinguish the proposed Center from those is our affiliation with an autonomous research program at IASIA and the novel, problem-focused Assessment Clinics.

The American population, like the rest of the industrialized world, is getting older. Those over 65 years old, currently 12% of the total population, will rise to about 20% by the year 2020. The reason for this is two-fold. First, the post-war baby boom (those born from 1945 to 1960) resulted in a population cohort that is now middle-age, and when this group reaches 65, the geriatric population (arbitrarily defined as those 65 years and older) will by far, exceed the pediatric population. The second reason is that people are living longer. The last century has seen the median survival rise by 30 years for both men and women. Thus, there is a large cohort (the baby boomers) reaching the geriatric age group and individuals within this group are likely to live in this geriatric age group for many years (on average, two decades).

The methods of geriatric medicine differ from the traditional medical model in several ways. Geriatric medicine involves team management with a heavy emphasis on maintenance of function and autonomy and disease prevention. Not everyone over the age of 65 needs this approach. In fact, for the majority between 65 and 75, the traditional medical model suffices very well. However, after the age of 75, the typical individual has one, two or more chronic medical conditions, and a complex treatment program that often involves five or more prescribed medications. Furthermore, the need for adjunctive therapies such as dialysis or chemotherapy become much more common. In this situation, patients often find themselves with several physicians and with discoordinated care.

The Institutes Geriatrics Center is developed with the express purpose of providing a single venue for coordinated care, with specific attention to the most common problems encountered in this age group. The Geriatrics Center will be a model program founded on principles advanced at the finest academic medical centers but applied to real world community practice.

Send Donations to:
IASIA
6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 940
Falls Church, VA 22042

We are a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and all of your donations are fully tax deductible.

Scholars & Residents

Dedicated to the promotion of health, quality of life, and the independence of older people, the Institute conducts and facilitates biomedical research and education in geriatric medicine. Our mission is to unite researchers, educators and clinicians in order to accelerate the pace of discovery in geriatric medicine.

The Scholar-In-Residence Program

The Scholar-In-Residence Program began as a unique way to help young physicians develop research experience in the field of geriatrics and to provide services to the geriatric community. The goals and objectives for this position include:

  • Providing an increased level of medical attention for the short and long term well being of older people.
  • Garnering the interest a young and diverse group of physicians to learn about medical issues pertinent to the geriatric population.
  • Furthering the development of critical skills for the young doctor, including writing and executing clinical protocols, publishing and reviewing scientific literature and developing collaborations with entities such as the NIA, pharmaceutical sponsors and universities.
  • Contributing to the local geriatric community through medical services and other evolving projects.
  • Discussing and presenting new findings at national and international conferences.

The Scholar-In-Residence has the opportunity to develop several vital skills in areas ranging from designing and writing research protocols, to supervising the administration of research trials, to obtaining grant funding, to public presentations and writing manuscripts. This position grooms the young doctor for successful application of the wide variety of talents needed to become a leader in today's medical world through mentoring and hands on experience with creative and meaningful clinical research.

Prior IASIA Scholars:

Dr. Neelima Denduluri Upon completion of Internal Medicine Residency at Georgetown University Medical Center, Dr. Denduluri completed a two year association scholarship whereupon she investigated various aspects of aging and cancer. Thereafter, she completed her training at the National Cancer Institute and is currently an associate of Virginia Cancer Care Associated and is now considered a national resource on breast cancer.

Dr. Mark Janowski completed his Internal Medicine/Pediatrics Residency at Georgetown University Medical Center and thereafter joined IASIA as a Scholar in Residence for one year. In collaboration with investigators at the National Institute on Aging, Dr. Janowski performed critical research on the persistence of protection after the Small Pox vaccine. After his IASIA year, Dr. Janowski moved to the Centers for Disease Control (Atlanta) to complete training in infectious disease and epidemiology. Dr. Janowski is currently an active clinician and clinical investigator in Southern California.

Dr. Andrew S. Artz completed is Internal Medicine Residency at Georgetown University Medical Center before assuming his two year Scholarship with IASIA. Thereafter, Dr. Artz completed fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Chicago where he remains on faculty. Dr. Artz has continued active research on aging, particularly as it relates to anemia. He has also championed the expansion of novel therapies including bone marrow transplantation to older patients. He is now recognized as a major academic leader in geriatric hematology, and he remains active in IASIA programs.

Send Donations to:
IASIA
6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 940
Falls Church, VA 22042

We are a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and all of your donations are fully tax deductible.

AREC

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Send Donations to:
IASIA
6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 940
Falls Church, VA 22042

We are a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and all of your donations are fully tax deductible.

IASIA Clinical Center

We are proposing a first of its kind geriatrics clinical service in the Washington metropolitan area. The principles, however, have been established elsewhere; as similar programs have been developed within academic centers. What will distinguish the proposed Center from those is our affiliation with an autonomous research program at IASIA and the novel, problem-focused Assessment Clinics.

The American population, like the rest of the industrialized world, is getting older. Those over 65 years old, currently 12% of the total population, will rise to about 20% by the year 2020. The reason for this is two-fold. First, the post-war baby boom (those born from 1945 to 1960) resulted in a population cohort that is now middle-age, and when this group reaches 65, the geriatric population (arbitrarily defined as those 65 years and older) will by far, exceed the pediatric population. The second reason is that people are living longer. The last century has seen the median survival rise by 30 years for both men and women. Thus, there is a large cohort (the baby boomers) reaching the geriatric age group and individuals within this group are likely to live in this geriatric age group for many years (on average, two decades).

The methods of geriatric medicine differ from the traditional medical model in several ways. Geriatric medicine involves team management with a heavy emphasis on maintenance of function and autonomy and disease prevention. Not everyone over the age of 65 needs this approach. In fact, for the majority between 65 and 75, the traditional medical model suffices very well. However, after the age of 75, the typical individual has one, two or more chronic medical conditions, and a complex treatment program that often involves five or more prescribed medications. Furthermore, the need for adjunctive therapies such as dialysis or chemotherapy become much more common. In this situation, patients often find themselves with several physicians and with discoordinated care.

The IASIA Clinical Center is developed with the express purpose of providing a single venue for coordinated care, with specific attention to the most common problems encountered in this age group. The Center will be a model program founded on principles advanced at the finest academic medical centers but applied to real world community practice.

Send Donations to:
IASIA
6400 Arlington Blvd, Suite 940
Falls Church, VA 22042

We are a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and all of your donations are fully tax deductible.

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  • Executive Summary

    The discipline of geriatric medicine has evolved over the past two decades to address the challenges presented by our aging community. Currently, 13% of the population is over the age of 65 years, and this number will nearly double in the next...

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